BILLS OF ENTRY, OTHER IMPORT DOCUMENTS

Ctg customs urges traders to give responsive declaration

Staff Correspondent | Published: 22:19, Apr 10,2021

 
 

A file photo shows containers at the Chattogram port. Customs House Chattogram has urged traders to furnish responsive declaration in the bills of entry and other import documents to facilitate speedy customs assessment and release of imported goods. — New Age photo

Customs House Chattogram has urged traders to furnish responsive declaration in the bills of entry and other import documents to facilitate speedy customs assessment and release of imported goods.

The CHC made the request in a recent letter sent to stakeholders, including importers and their customs and clearing agents, saying that responsive declarations would also reduce the cost of doing business.

Customs officials conduct physical examination of only 10 per cent of imported goods while the remaining 90 per cent consignments are released after customs assessment without physical examination of the goods, officials said.

The customs house handles about 92 per cent of the country’s seaborne trade in terms of both export and import.

But it is often seen that the importers and their agents do not furnish the exact and accurate information related to the HS code, price and ingredients of the imported products, they said.

The absence of accurate and exact information causes complexities in determining the actual HS code and conduction of customs assessment, resulting in unexpected delay in the release of imported goods, they added.

They said that a trader was supposed to furnish true and authentic information in the bills of entry and other import documents.

There are provisions in the Customs Act-1969 for penalty and punishments for making false declarations to the customs authorities about the description, quantity, quality and value of import-export goods.

The customs authorities want the traders to provide accurate information to avoid penalties and this can be achieved through responsive declarations, they added.

For example, the letter said that many importers stated the name of the products as taps and cocks in their import documents without furnishing detailed information.

But the minimum import price of the products varies depending on the raw materials of the products.

The minimum price of taps and cocks made of iron or steel is $3 per kilogram while the price of those products made of brass is $5 a kg.

The classification is also different for kitchenware and sanitary items based on ingredients, the letter stated.

For example, the classification chapter number for plastic-made kitchenware and sanitary items is 39, for ceramic-made items is 69, for glass-made products is 70, for copper-made items is 74 and the number for aluminium-made kitchenware and sanitary items is 76.

Customs assessment and release of machinery faces complexities if detailed information related to the brand, model, art number, part number and unit measurement is not provided correctly, it said, adding that the same thing happens with the release of food items if the ingredients are not properly furnished.

Under the circumstances, the importers are requested to furnish responsive declaration in the bills of entry and other import documents containing the specific description, quantity and quality of products, brand name, model number, unit measurement and ingredients to expedite customs assessment and release of imported goods as well as reduce the cost of doing business, the letter said.

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