Road safety movement: aftermath…

New Age Youth | Published at 12:00am on September 09, 2018

Following the road safety movement, the government, apparently, took some steps to fend off casualties on the roads. Despite, people are being killed in road accidents every day. Is any positive change possible within the existing road transportation system? New Age Youth asks this question to students.   

Saleh Ahmed
University of Dhaka


'We want justice’ was the slogan of recent student movement for road safety. The government said it is a valid demand, but the citizens also have some responsibilities. But unfortunately we don't follow the traffic rules. The government have taken immediate actions, though, sustaining the existing system, these actions are nothing but a show. After all if all citizens do their designated duties, this problem will be solved.

Adrita Roy
SOS Hermann Gmeiner College

We all know the situation of road safety in our country. Our government consented to the demands of the student protest that was going on in the early August. I don’t know how much of it has been put into action but seeing the increased number of killings on roads, I am disappointed, honestly. Each and every person must feel safe on the roads. But instead of that, we have to continue our journeys in fear of death. So I think, since the protest, the situation hasn’t changed that much. People are being killed on road accidents frequently, even during the protest. I am sure our government will take enough steps to stop road killings but now it’s a burning issue. I hope people of Bangladesh will soon feel safe and sound on roads while traveling and our government will soon take cautious steps regarding road safety.

Mohammad Tarek Aziz Bappi
University of Dhaka

People are still being killed on the roads because the major terms or demands of the road-safety movement to bring stability on the roads are yet to be fulfilled. Anarchy on roads continues undisturbed. The major demands of the protesting students were; a) Merging all buses under the shade of certain number of transport companies; b) Taking steps to employ certified and skilled drivers and bringing them under salary system; c) Prohibiting contractual bus operation; d) The highest punishment for road killings should be death penalty; e) Constructing speed breakers on accident prone areas; f) Prohibiting unfit vehicles and stopping the certification of BRTA driving licenses to unfit and unskilled drivers; g) Eliminating child drivers from the scenario; h) Checking the failures of police administration to ensure stability on the roads; and finally, i) Raising consciousness among the mass on road safety. Until and unless the above actions from both the government and people are met, killing on roads won't be stopped.

Abul Khaer
Govt. Saadat University College, Tangail


Save our lives from perishing on the roads – this say is being voiced on the highways by the pedestrians, society’s backward and illiterate mass who have to go out looking for livelihoods. Actually, it is shocking to write that our highways have come to such a situation – not a day goes by without fatal street accident taking place in some part of the country, in most cases these kinds of people are victims. The lives of these people have become so cheap now that if dozens of them die in road accidents, the higher, relevant authorities show no interest. Despite of the reports on the violation of traffic rules, and of neglecting the duty by the law enforcers, hardly any step has been taken by the concerned authorities. Centering the movement by students, newer traffic rules were implemented and the directives were given by the prime minister, however, its application is still conspicuously absent on the highways. In addition, despite banning three wheelers and slow moving vehicles on the highways, these vehicles are plying on the roads. In order to minimise the death toll on the highways, the authorities must apply the rules of laws.

Ritu Onwayee Sara
London Grace International School



The ongoing numbers of accidents and unsafe road condition clearly point out to the failure in ‘carrying out’ the particular measures promised by the government. We have become accustomed to unfulfilled promises and claims for a long time. So inevitably, the people would rather see actions than fall for claims. Awareness may have been raised through recent movements and the government may have been taking such issues under strict attention. However, we still await noteworthy measures from the government that would lead to better results.