Rob terms govt ‘autocratic vote robber’

Staff Correspondent | Published: 00:46, Nov 14,2019

 
 

Guests attend a discussion on student politics organised by Bangladesh Women Scientist Association at the National Press Club on Wednesday. — New Age photo

Jatiya Samajtantrik Dal president ASM Abdur Rob on Wednesday termed the government ‘autocratic vote robbery’ and claimed that the world witnessed such type of autocrat for the first time in Bangladesh.

Addressing a discussion on ‘Student Politics: Past, Present and Future’ organised by Bangladesh Association of Women Scientists at National Press Club in the capital as the chief guest, he said that the world witnessed two types of autocrats – military autocrat and civil autocrat, but such type of autocrat who robbed people’s right to vote was new in the world.

Rob, also a former vice president of Dhaka University Central Students’ Union, said that the present government had come to power through robbing people’s vote in the December 30 national elections in the previous night.  

He said this government had ‘murdered’ the country’s independence, the Constitution, democracy, justice and judiciary and he demanded justice for the ‘murders’.

Nagarik Oikya convener, also a former DUCSU VP, Mahmudur Rahman Manna recalled that Pakistan’s autocrat Ayub Khan used to celebrate the development issues and GDP growth but could not cling to power. ‘No autocratic government can remain in power in this country.’

He said that students should raise their voice against all injustices including price hike of essentials like onion and rice.

Recalling that the students had made the movements and struggles in 1952 and in 1971, the former student leader said that they should act as vanguards when the country’s democracy was at stake.

The association president and Bangladesh Nationalist Party chairperson’s advisor Shahida Rafique chaired the discussion.

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