CTTC fears Rohingya extremism if repatriation delayed

Staff Correspondent | Published: 17:27, Apr 23,2019 | Updated: 01:18, Apr 24,2019

 
 
Sri Lanka blasts

Counter Terrorism and Transnational Crimes unit chief Monirul Islam speaks at the meet-the-press programme of Crime Reporters Association of Bangladesh at CIRDAP auditorium in Dhaka on Tuesday. — UNB photo

Dhaka Metropolitan Police counter-terrorism and transnational crime unit chief Monirul Islam on Tuesday expressed fear that Rohingya children in future might be involved in extremism if repatriation of Rohingyas was delayed.
‘As you know senior UN officials are coming to Bangladesh. We are optimistic that they will be repatriated in the shortest possible time,’ Monirul, also metropolitan police additional commissioner, said at a meet the press organised by Crime Reporters Association Bangladesh.
Metropolitan police spokesperson deputy commissioner Masudur Rahman and counter-terrorism unit deputy commissioner Abdul Mannan were present at the programme chaired by association president Abul Khair.
Three senior UN officials would visit Bangladesh for three days from Wednesday to beef up support for the humanitarian needs of over one million Rohingyas who took shelter in Bangladesh feeling violence in Rahaine State of Myanmar.
The three UN officials — UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi, International Organisation for Migration director general António Vitorino and UN under-secretary general for humanitarian affairs Mark Lowcock — are also scheduled to visit Rohingya camps in Cox’s Bazar.
Monirul said that until the Rohingyas were repatriated, they along with other security and intelligence agencies would continue cautious monitoring as international extremist outfits were trying to attract vulnerable Rohingyas.
‘Those who are now children, in future they are likely to get involved in extremism if strict monitoring is not in place,’ Monirul said.
He, however, claimed that so far Rohingyas were not involved in extremism.
About the latest extremist attack in Sri Lanka, Monirul said that extremists in Bangladesh had no such capacity for similar attacks but they continued their monitoring.
About the possible returns of reported extremists from Iraq and Syria, Monirul said that most of the Bangladesh-origin extremism suspects left the country for Middle East at the end of 2014 and now they needed travel pass from any third country as their passports already expired.
‘Our intelligence networks are active and immigration is also kept on alert so that anyone will be arrested upon their arrival in the country,’ said Monirul.
He also suspected that the recently announced amir of ‘Islamic State in Bangladesh’ possibly lived in Iraq or Syria not in Bangladesh.

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