Constitution Day today

Staff Correspondent | Published: 00:45, Nov 04,2018

 
 

The nation celebrates the Constitution Day today.
On November 4, 1972, Bangladesh adopted its Constitution but it was given antedated validity with effect from December 16, 972, the 1st independence day of the People’s Republic.
Since 1972, November 4 has been celebrated as the new republic’s Constitution Day.
As a free nation Bangladesh travelled through ups and downs in last 47 years, including one party rule and martial law rules but there was no break in constitutional continuity as the Constitution was never abrogated through it was amended 17 times some highly controversial and tailored to perpetuate autocratic rule.
On July 15, 1973, the 1st Amendment was brought to try and punish 195 Pakistani prisoners accused of committing genocide , crimes against humanity or war crimes.
On September 22, 1973 the 2nd Amendment was brought to incorporate the emergency provision by suspending fundamental rights.
On November 28, 1974, the 3rd Amendment ratified the Bangladesh-India Land Boundary Agreement signed by prime ministers Sheikh Mujibur Rahman and Indira Gandhi.
On January 25, 1975, the 4th Amendment introduced for one-party BKSAL rule in Bangladesh and brought the judiciary under the president’s control.
The 5th Amendment, the 7th Amendment, the 8th Amendment, the 13th Amendment and the 16th Amendment had been struck down by the Supreme Court.
On April 6, 1975 the 5th Amendment ratified the martial law proclamation of president Khandker Moshtaque Ahmed.
In 1978, under the 2nd Proclamation Order Bismillahir Rahmanir Rahim was inserted in the Preamble of the Constitution and ‘the Principles of absolute trust and faith in the Almighty Allah’ replaced Secularism one of the four fundamental principles of the State.
On July 10, 1981, he 6th Amendment enabled then vice president Justice Abdus Sattar to contest the presidential election.
On November 11, 1986, the 7th Amendment ratified military ruler Lieutenant General HM Ershad’s martial law proclamation.
On June 9,1988 through the 8th Amendment Ershad incorporated in the Constitution Islam as the state religion of Bangladesh.
Under the same amendment High Court Divisions’ benches were opened outside the capital.
On July 11, 1989, the 9th Amendment provided for holding together elections to the offices of the president and the vice-present.
On June 23, 1990, the 10th Amendment extended the provision of women’s reserved seats in Parliament for 10 years.
On August 10, 1991, the 11th Amendment made the provisions for the return of acting president Chief Justice Shahabuddin Ahmed took the office of acting president after the fall of military dictator Ershad in December 1990.
On September 18, 1991, 12th Amendment restored parliamentary democracy in Bangladesh after 16 years.
On March 28, 1996, 13th Amendment introduced nonparty caretaker government system for holding general elections.
In 2004, the 14th Amendment provided for electing women to their reserved seats in Parliament for political parties according to proportional strength in Parliament and extended the retirement age of Supreme Court judges.
On July 3, 2011, the 15th Amendment abolished the provision of holding parliamentary elections under non-party caretaker government.
On September 17, 2014, 16th Amendment restored Parliament’s power to remove Supreme Court Judges for incapacity and misbehavior.
In July 2018, the last and 17th Amendment extended women’s reserved seats by 25 years or until 2044.

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