Nazmul shifts blame on Sakib

Staff Correspondent | Published: 00:05, Oct 10,2018 | Updated: 23:52, Oct 09,2018

 
 

Nazmul Hasan

The Bangladesh Cricket Board president Nazmul Hasan on Tuesday refused to take the blame of all-rounder Sakib al Hasan’s present injury situation despite primarily insisting the player on playing in the recent Asia Cup.
Sakib returned from Asia Cup with grave condition of his injured before Bangladesh’s final Super Four match against Pakistan and underwent an immediate surgery in Dhaka to avoid greater danger.
The 31-year old cricketer later said they if he had delayed his surgery a little more his finger would have been completely spoilt, thereby jeopardising his career.
Sakib, who hurt his left little finger during a one-day international tournament in January, felt some pain during the tour of West Indies in July and suggested he should have the surgery before the Asia Cup.
Nazmul was initially against the idea before leaving the matter on the player, who played four matches in Asia Cup to score just 49 runs and claim seven wickets.
‘I suggested him to take a decision after consulting with a good doctor,’ Nazmul told reporters in Gulshan.
‘He asked me if he should do it [the surgery] now or later. I told him that it was his decision. When he again came to Medina [Saudi Arabia] I told him the same thing.
‘Last time in Medina, I told him to consult with a doctor. He told me that the physio assured him that there would be no problem. I asked him whether situation may aggravate in case he played. Even then I told him to meet a doctor and take his advice before making a decision,’ he added.
Nazmul said he initially suggested Sakib to wait for his surgery and play in the Asia Cup as he was not fully aware of the situation.
‘You could ask me why I had said that the surgery had to be performed after the Asia Cup,’ Nazmul said.
‘The day I said that it was the first day I had heard about it. I didn’t know that he required any surgery. The problem can remain, but the doctors have informed me that he could continue playing if the finger is at 70 per cent.’
Nazmul indicated that the painkiller that Sakib received in West Indies might have side affect leading him to infection.
‘He took a painkiller injection in West Indies and that can have a side effect,’ said Nazmul.
‘The steroid can play a part if there is any kind of infection. But it is all assumption and we are hoping to get the report soon when we will understand how it happened,’ he added.
Sakib is currently undergoing treatment in Australia, where he may undergo a second surgery soon depending on the situation of his finger.
Before leaving the home for Australia on Friday, Sakib feared his injured finger might never return to 100 per cent normal shape even if he had the second surgery as planned.

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