‘Resolving Rohingya crisis is international obligation’

Staff Correspondent | Published: 00:52, Sep 03,2018

 
 

Academicians on Sunday said that resolving the Rohingya crisis was an international obligation.
It’s not a problem between Bangladesh and Myanmar, they said at the concluding ceremony of a two-day international conference at Dhaka University.
They also said that Bangladesh should strengthen its diplomatic efforts for a sustainable solution to the Rohingya crisis and that the international communities should make efforts to ensure voluntary, safe and dignified return of Rohingyas to their homeland protecting their rights.
The conference, titled Rohingya: Politics, Ethnic Cleansing and Uncertainty, was organized by DU department of criminology on the campus.
University of Liberal Arts Bangladesh director professor Salimullah Khan said that solution of the Rohingya crisis is an international obligation.
He also said that Rohingya crisis is not merely a bilateral problem of Bangladesh and Myanmar and that it had other dimensions.
Salimullah requested all to treat the atrocities on the Rohingyas as genocide.
DU professor Abul Barakat said that Bangladesh should strengthen its effort to face the Rohingya crisis.
‘Our foreign minister could visit at least the ASEAN countries but that did not happen’ he said adding ‘many positive steps were not taken to resolve the Rohingya crisis.’
UNHCR deputy country representative Papa Kysma Sylla said that conditions prevailing in Myanmar’s Rakhine province were not conducive for safe, voluntary and dignified return of Rohingyas.
DU philosophy professor Anisuzzaman also addressed the concluding session moderated by the criminology department chairman professor Zia Rahman.
Participants from six countries presented 70 papers.
Since August 25, 2017 terrified, starving, exhausted Rohingyas have been arriving in Bangladesh trekking through hills and crossing rough sea and the Naf River.
More than 720,000 Rohingyas, fleeing violence and systemic discrimination in Rakhine State, took shelter in Cox’s Bazar since August 25, 2017.
They joined an estimated four lakh Rohingyas from previous waves of influxes caused by intimidation byMyanmar government and army since 1978.
The new influx began since August 25, 2017.

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