Movie Review

KILL BILL: Vol. 1

Sameer Mohammad Mubeen | Published: 00:00, Aug 26,2018

 
 
Movie Review

Satire, violence, humour- rather, dark humour; all intertwined in one place defines Quentin Tarantino movies. Kill Bill: Volume 1 is one of his most famous works, a grindhouse film which depicts well-plotted cold-blooded revenge by a woman who was tried to be murdered along with her unborn child. Sameer Mohammad Mubeen reviews the action-thriller released in 2003 which is a must watch till date.

Quentin Tarantino is quite clearly a genius. Perhaps the most violent genius you’ll ever come across. He really knows how to mix humor with blood, gore and even more violence. Now, that isn’t quite easy in Hollywood nowadays, yet he’s always up for that challenge no matter how crazy it sounds. He tends to surprise his viewers with a humorous dark kind of action; more like a simple plot with a lot of blood and body parts flying around. But can only violence and blood make him a genius? That would be such an understatement as he really knows how to get the attention of his viewers with any sort of content that he produces. Although known for his violence and unpredictability, Tarantino knows how to create suspense and most importantly great storyline.

Tarantino suddenly jumped into the universe of martial arts movies. The thought for Kill Bill was shaped by Tarantino and Uma Thurman in a bar amid the taping of Pulp Fiction. In 2000, Thurman kept running into Tarantino at an Oscar party and asked whether he had gained any ground with the thought. He guaranteed her that he would compose the content as a birthday introduce for her, at first saying he would complete in two weeks, however it wound up taking a year. Tarantino needed to learn on the fly how to make a kung fu film, working and improving the successions as he came. This sounds very challenge as I really think no other director in Hollywood has quite the talent to pull off such a crazy violent action thriller. The diversity that comes with such content is quite emphatic.

The plot focuses on revenge, as a female assassin known as the Bride (Thurman) tries to slaughter those engaged with the savage assault on her and her wedding party. That’s how the movie begins; Uma laying on the floor with fresh wounds and bruises all over her face. Running over spending plan and over timetable, Tarantino persisted with the undertaking, shooting so much that he in the end needed to make two movies. Kill Bill: Vol. 1 was released in late 2003, with Kill Bill: Vol. 2 following a couple of months later. We’re also waiting for a third movie that’s coming out soon. A revenge film sounds very interesting but there’s just so much more that it needs to be an action-packed success. The Bride, played by Uma Thurman is almost like a superhero as she pinpoints and kills all the traitors that caused her trouble during her wedding. Also note it down that she was pregnant during the wedding, later staying in coma for the next four years; consequently losing her child. This saddens her and she gets the urge to seek revenge against all who conspired.

Throughout all the seriousness, Tarantino knows how to perfectly mix humor with such content. That’s something very rare in movies nowadays. The Asian twist makes this film so enthralling that at times I felt as if I was really watching a genuine Asian Kung-Fu film. The sets and extras were perfect as it really sets the mood. Oh and the blood; so much blood that Tarantino was asked to edit out violent bits from the film. But he refused to do so, rather just changed the scenes to black and white in order to overshadow the violence. In Kill Bill, Tarantino brings back the delicious sin to films — the excitement you get from something dirty, messy and risky. Tarantino sets the state of mind with a faded logo, finished with scratchy sound, clearly a tribute to the Shaw Brothers. Similarly as with Tarantino's past movies, Kill Bill includes a diverse soundtrack involving numerous musical genres. On the two soundtracks, music ranges from country music to Spaghetti Western film scores of Ennio Morricone.

 It may seem very plain when being said, but when this man directs something there’s just so much more to pay attention to.  He makes plain day to day conversations seem so interesting that it really gets you to the edge of your seat. It seems as if his viewers really understand every bit of what’s being said, but do they really? That’s what makes him such a great filmmaker as he completely gets us engaged to the scene that we’re casually watching. It becomes more of an experience rather than just a conversation. It’s because of how the speech is delivered and perceived. This gives the film great value since his viewers sink into the story as soon as the film begins.

It's a martial arts film universe where the typical laws of financial aspects, police work, physiology and gravity don't have any significant bearing: a world made out of a splendidly insinuating tissue of spaghetti western and Asian combative techniques. It may not be the best film of the year, neither the best Tarantino film; but there's a genuine quintessence here; Kill Bill just leaves you feeling energized: absurdly, fiercely energized. How many films can do that?

Sameer Mohammad Mubeen is a student of North South University.

 

 

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