Boy shot in eye by BSF now preparing for treatment in India

Muktadir Rashid | Published: 00:35, Jun 14,2018

 
 

Shot by Indian Border Security Force inside Kurigram border in April, 14-year-old schoolboy Muhammad Rasel Mia along with his family members now plans to get better treatment at an Indian hospital in Chennai, said his family.
‘We are trying to go to the Indian hospital as soon as we get our passports,’ said Rasel’s brother Rubel Mia on Wednesday.
The family took the decision of travelling to Indian hospital as the physicians in Dhaka found no hope about the eyes badly damaged in BSF firing.
On April 30, Rasel and his father Hanif Uddin were grazing their cows and cutting grass on the bank of bordering River Banidao at Phulbari in northern Kurigram when they experienced an ambush by Indian Border Security Force inside Bangladesh territory, resulting Rasel’s head and eyes injured.
Rasel was shot in the right eye and face and was likely to lose his eyesight as described by the physicians at the National Institute of Ophthalmology and Hospital in Dhaka.
The family complained that Rasel was not given proper treatment while he was in the eye hospital in Dhaka for a month, and they left the hospital on May 31 without any hope.
The physicians denied the allegation and said they tried their best for the boy.
Following the incident, the National Human Rights Commission and Ain O Salish Kendra intervened into the shooting incident of 14-year-old boy.
The NHRC already wrote to the Kurigram district administration seeking information about the boy, and its chairman Kazi Reazul Hoque on Tuesday phoned the Kurigram deputy commissioner to facilitate the victim’s family to get passport as soon as possible.
The ASK wrote separate letters to the Indian High Commission in Dhaka and Indian National Human Rights Commission informing his condition.
The ASK officials said Indian High Commission did not respond as yet but Indian High Commission in Dhaka had already responded to the issue and spoke to the victim’s family over the treatment and other expenses.
‘His treatment was critical after Bangladeshi physicians found no hope out of his injured eyes,’ said Abu Ahmed Faijul Kabir, the ASK coordinator, adding, ‘First time, the Indian high commission respond and inquired about his treatment’.
Rasel’s brother Rubel told New Age they were approached by the Indian High Commission official over their travel to India.
In the battalion level meeting on May 3, the Indian BSF regretted their deeds.

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