US-Bangla plane crash victims yet to get compensation

Muktadir Rashid | Published: 23:56, May 31,2018 | Updated: 00:24, Jun 01,2018

 
 

US Bangla Airlines Dash 8 aircraft crashed on approach to Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu of Nepal on Monday. — airportwebcams twitter photo

The families of the victims who were killed or injured in US-Bangla Airlines plane crash at Kathmandu airport in Nepal on March 12 were yet to get any compensation.
The plane crash killed 47 passengers and 4 crewmembers, mostly from Bangladesh and Nepal, including 28 from Bangladesh.
Most of the successors of the victims in Bangladesh have submitted their documents to the designated law firm, FM Associates, dealing the compensation process from the airlines.
Masud Uddin Bhuiyan of Tangail told New Age in the past week that he had submitted the documents to FM Associates two weeks ago.
Masud lost her wife Umme Salma in the plane crash and said that they were not sure when the compensation would be given.
US-Bangla airlines deputy general manager Kamrul Islam said that they had forwarded all the information to the law firm.
‘Almost all the affected people in the country have communicated us and they have filed lawsuit for succession,’ said the FM Associates representative Al Amin Rahman on Tuesday.
The courts usually take about four months to give decision on a succession, he said, adding that once the successors were finalised, they would pay the insurance.
‘We hope it will be completed by third quarter of the year,’ said Al Amin.
He also said a Nepalese law firm was also working in Kathmandu on the compensation.
A member of Aircraft Accident Investigation Group, however, said that insurance and compensation were not the same as compensation would be finalised by under the Carriage of Air (International Convention) Act 1966.
According to Rule 22 of the First Schedule of the 1966 act, in case of the death or injury of the passenger ‘the liability of the carrier for each passenger is limited to the sum of two hundred and fifty thousand francs.’
Both Bangladesh and Nepal are signatories to the Warsaw Convention signed in 1929 which sets a far lower minimum liability, $8,300, and it states that an airline is not liable for any amount over the minimum ‘if it can prove it took all possible steps to avoid the accident.’
Since the crash, the US-Bangla has been accusing the Air Traffic Control of creating confusion over the landing direction resulting into the crash.
On April 11, Bangladesh civil aviation and tourism minister AKM Shahjahan Kamal said that the families of those killed in the plane crash would get at least $50,000 each in compensation according to the Warsaw Convention and the insurance company would provide the money to the families. Injured passengers would be compensated according to their medical bills, the minister said. 

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