Avoid heroism, Greenidge tells Tigers

Staff Correspondent | Published: 00:05, May 17,2018 | Updated: 01:15, May 17,2018

 
 

Former Bangladesh national cricket team coach Gordon Greenidge poses for photograph with the members of national team preliminary squad at the Sher-e-Bangla National Stadium on Wednesday. — New Age photo

Former national team coach Gordon Greenidge on Wednesday asked Bangladesh players to avoid heroism and aggression at the start of their innings if they are to be successful in international cricket.
Greenidge visited Bangladesh Cricket Board headquarters in the afternoon and was warmly greeted by the players and officials.
‘The best advice I can give is to make sure you are focused and concentrate on your game. That will take you a long way,’ Greenidge told the members of national team preliminary squad.
‘Don’t try to be too heroic or aggressive at the beginning. You can still score runs at the death and your these sort of things will give your team a proper total to be successful,’ said Greenidge, who played 108 Tests and 111 one-day internationals for West Indies to score 30 international hundreds.
‘Sometimes you may shift your batting order to make a balance of the team, especially in one-day cricket.
‘But obviously good start at the top is important for every team. So all the best and practice hard and practice well and hopefully successful for Bangladesh cricket,’ he said.
Greenidge, who guided Bangladesh to glory in 1997 ICC Trophy and also coached the Tigers in 1999 World Cup, is currently in Bangladesh on a five-day visit.
The BCB on Monday gave him a reception apparently to bury the hatchet after sacking him unceremoniously night before Bangladesh’s World Cup win over Pakistan at Northampton in 1999.
Greenidge, who is also an honorary citizen of Bangladesh, visited the country only once since then.
‘You have to remain consistent whatever you do. I can only offer you good luck in the next series in West Indies or India wherever,’ he said.
Bangladesh ODI captain Mashrafee bin Murtaza presented him a jersey of national team while batsman Mushfiq presented him a Bangladesh cap, signed by all members of national team preliminary squad.
Some of the players were overawed at the mere sight of the Caribbean legends, who won World Cup twice with West Indies and was known one of the most destructive batsmen of his time.
‘We heard a lot about him as he was Bangladesh coach. But I was then only a kid,’ said all-rounder Mehedi Hasan. ‘He was a legend. So I felt good when I could speak to him. He told us to work hard.’
Meanwhile, speaking a reception hosted by the Bangladesh Cricket Supporters Association earlier in the afternoon Greenidge recalled the memories of ICC Trophy in 1997.
‘Little did we know that winning the ICC trophy in Kula Lumpur would create such an atmosphere in Dhaka,’ he said about the euphoria created by the win.
‘We know what happened after that [following the ICC trophy in 1997]. Bangladesh cricket has taken a new flight. It’s just a pity that I couldn’t be with you during that period as well.
‘I am happy to be part of an association that I felt was at that time sceptical and hesitant of their own ability. But I think the players themselves knew that they had qualities that only needed to be exposed and this was done in Kula Lumpur.’
Greenidge will leave Dhaka on May 18. 

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