World reacts to strikes on Syria

Published: 00:05, Apr 16,2018 | Updated: 23:47, Apr 15,2018

 
 

Demonstrators protest after the missile strikes on Syria, outside the White House in Washington, US, on Saturday. — Reuters photo

Iran, Russia condemn US, UK, France attacks, support comes from allies including Canada, Israel
New Age Desk
The decision by the US president, Donald Trump, to launch air strikes on Syria with backing from the UK and France has proved globally divisive, with some countries praising the military action while others condemned it as provocative and unacceptable, reports The Guradian.
Among the strongest critics of the airstrikes were Russia and Iran, staunch allies of the Syrian president, Bashar al-Assad, who both have a military presence on the ground in Syria.
The Russian president, Vladimir Putin, denounced the strikes as an ‘act of aggression’ that would exacerbate humanitarian catastrophe in Syria.
In a statement issued by the Kremlin, the Russian leader said Moscow was calling an emergency meeting of the United Nations security council over the strikes launched by the US, Britain and France.
Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, called the US-led strikes on Syria a ‘military crime’. According to state news agency IRNA, Khamenei spoke at a meeting with Iranian officials and ambassadors from some Islamic countries.
Germany’s chancellor, Angela Merkel, said the allied strikes in Syria were a ‘necessary and appropriate’ response to what the US and its allies say was a recent chemical attack in the Syrian city of Douma.
Merkel said Berlin viewed the US, UK and France had taken ‘responsibility in this way as permanent members of the UN security council ... to maintain the effectiveness of the international rejection of chemical weapons use and to warn the Syrian regime against further violations’.
In a response to questions about the strikes, China’s foreign ministry called any military action that bypasses the UN security council a violation of international law.
‘We consistently oppose the use of force in international relations, and advocate respect for the sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity of all countries,’ foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said in a statement.
The European commission president, Jean-Claude Juncker, said those who rely on chemical warfare must be held to account by the world.
Juncker said the suspected use of poison gas last week in the Syrian city of Douma was as he puts it a ‘heinous chemical weapons attack carried out by the Syrian regime’. He said the world ‘has the responsibility to identify and hold accountable those responsible’ for the attack.
The Canadian prime minister, Justin Trudeau, who this week ruled out his country’s participation in military action in Syria, announced his unequivocal support for the targeted bombings.
Israel, which was recently accused by Iran of carrying out its own airstrikes on military bases in Syria, was among the first to praise the strikes.
The Nato secretary general, Jens Stoltenberg, said the actions by the US, France and UK coalition should be supported because they would ‘reduce the government’s ability to further attack the people of Syria with chemical weapons’.
‘Nato has consistently condemned Syria’s continued use of chemical weapons as a clear breach of international norms and agreements,’ he said. ‘The use of chemical weapons is unacceptable, and those responsible must be held accountable.’
Turkey’s foreign ministry said it welcomed the strikes as an ‘appropriate response’.
Ankara said chemical weapons attacks that indiscriminately target civilians ‘constitute crimes against humanity’ and should not go unpunished.
UN secretary- general, Antonio Guterres, said that while use of chemical weapons was ‘abhorrent’ and ‘horrendous’, he urged caution in retaliating, expressing concern that any escalation of the violence would only increase the suffering of those living in Syria.
The strikes carried out by the US, France and Britain against Syrian military targets could give terrorism an opportunity to expand in the region, the Iraqi foreign ministry said, calling the raids ‘a very dangerous development’.
Meanwhile, Pope Francis called on world leaders to renew efforts to bring peace to Syria, saying he was deeply troubled by their failure to agree on a joint plan to end the bloodshed.

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