A murder left unravelled for five years

Published: 00:05, Mar 07,2018 | Updated: 23:52, Mar 06,2018

 
 

IT HAS already been five years yet investigators — in a sheer display of inefficiency as much as unwillingness, as the delay suggests — have yet to submit the charge sheet in the murder of Tanvir Mohammad Twaki, who was found dead afloat in a canal two days after had gone missing on March 6, 2013 in Narayanganj. The investigation changed hands once, with the Rapid Action Battalion taking over after the police had failed to unravel the mystery. Twaki’s father filed the case with the Narayangaj police on March 8, when the body was found, against seven unnamed suspects first and later named them. The Rapid Action Battalion in March 2014, based on confessional statements of two of the suspects made under Section 164 of the Code of Criminal Procedures, told media that they had found 11 people to be involved in the murder. But the battalion has yet to file the charge sheet in the case. A ranking battalion officer is reported to have said on Monday, as New Age reported on Tuesday, that they were investigating ‘the sensational case’ with ‘due importance’ even four years after the battalion had claimed that it had completed the investigation.
The delay in the investigation has only given rise to conjectures, further adding to the speculation that the nephew of the Awami League lawmaker was involved in the incident. When the battalion spoke to the media in 2014, it made the reference and Twaki’s father has also put down the delay in the submission of charge sheet to this bit. This has lent credence to the perception that it was because of the involvement of someone from the ruling party, someone close to the ruling party or someone from any government agencies in crimes, the investigators of such criminal incidents make inordinate delays in completing investigations, in submitting charge sheets and in making such incidents roll to the trial process. Such perceptions are also rife in the cases of a couple of other sensational murders — of journalist couple Sagar Sarowar and Meherun Runi who were found dead in their flat in Dhaka on February 11, 2012 and of Sohagi Jahan Tonu, a student of Victoria College in Comila who was found dead inside the Mainamati Cantonment after being raped on March 20, 2016. While the delay in the legal redress in all such cases leaves the families of the victim being denied justice, this also proves to be harming the rule of law and sets in the scope for recurrence of similar incidents.
The government must, therefore, rising above partisan interest, complete the investigation of not only the case of Twaki’s murder but all such crimes and submit the charge sheets at the earliest. The government must break the culture of impunity that such delay affords the perpetrators of the crimes. An early investigation and trial, fair and credible, has already become overdue to advance the rule of law.

More about:

Want stories like this in your inbox?

Sign up to exclusive daily email

Advertisement

images

 

Advertisement

images