New titles shed light on agony of urban life

Sadiqur Rahman | Published: 01:14, Feb 25,2018

 
 

Several new literary works hitting the Amar Ekhushey Book Fair tell stories that mirror a society in transition and give a realistic portrayal of contemporary issues experienced by people in their daily lives.
Given the population explosion as well as rural people increasingly moving to the ill-planned cities where a neat division between haves and have-nots exists, some humanist writers were keen on putting the people’s complex and sprawling humane relationships, their struggles and frustrations in the contemporary fictions.
Writer Zakir Talukder thinks that presenting the contemporary ever-changing social issues in literary works is a hard job as the author in most cases needs some time to grasp the issues properly.
Morality and values are crumbling in the face of consumerism and capitalistic greed, which many emerging writers could hardly portray in their writings due to their lack of political consciousness, he observes.
Hence, only a few emerging writers, among hundreds bringing new titles, have somewhat succeed in portraying urban life realistically, he comments.
Moshahida Sultana Ritu’s Boro Shororer Chhoto Golpo has got positive reviews from the readers. The title containing 15 short stories is a depiction of people’s hope and frustration in the country facing expansion of urbanisation on the expense of nature and environment. The book is published by Agamee Publications.
Mahbub Morshed’s novel Tomare Chinina Ami narrates stories of people who moved to cities from rural areas. He has portrayed the middle class people’s sprawling lives while raising some philosophical questions relating to humane love. The title is published by Adarsha.
Safinaz Sultana’s Sutopar High Heel, a collection of short stories, is published by Behula Bangla.
‘In the globalised world today, people blessed with technological advancement and time-shortening communication systems are having inconsistent relationships and can hardly differentiate between good and bad,’ Safinaz told New Age adding that her first title tells stories of such people.
Mazhar Sircar’s Priyotomo, Sundor Somoy Choliya Jay, a collection of poems, is published by Desh Publications.
According to the poet, unplanned urbanisation grasping agriculture-based traditional society of the country has made human life inconsistent. His poems depict agony of urban life and raise questions about development activities that fail to meet underprivileged people’s demands.
Shaheen Reza Rassel’s third collection of peoms Bhul Phagune Agun Dhele, published by Murdhonno, portrays love and frustration of romantic couples facing ever-changing realities of the urban society.
Ananya has published Mustafa Mamun’s novel Campus 1995, in which the author recollects old memories while relating them to some present day characters.
On Saturday, 182 new titles hit the bookstalls.
On 24th day of the fair, the copyright taskforce led by Tapan Bagchi raided the stall of Aligarh Library and seized copies of Mashiur Rahman’s The Bengal Chemistry, published by Presidency Publication as the title allegedly contains controversial comments about the country’s founding president Sheikh Mujibur Rahman.
The team also issued informal verbal warning to Doyel Prokashani for distributing leaflets on fair premises violating rules. 

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