A reunion series!

Staff Correspondent | Published: 00:05, Jan 14,2018 | Updated: 00:41, Jan 14,2018

 
 

Zimbabwe cricket coach Heath Streak (L) shares a light moment with Bangladesh one-day captain Mashrafee bin Murtaza during a training session at Mirpur on Saturday. — New Age photo

When Zimbabwe coach Heath Streak stepped into the Sher-e-Bangla National Stadium on Saturday he got a mixed feeling as he returned to a place where he spent good two years of his coaching career.
Sri Lanka coach Chandika Hathurusinghe is bound to get the same felling when he will take his team to the same venue today for practice ahead of the tri-nation one-day international tournament in Dhaka.
Any meeting between Streak, Hathurusinghe and Bangladesh Team Director Khaled Mahmud should be called as a happy reunion as they were once part of a same coaching and management group and that not very long ago.
Streak left Bangladesh in May 2016 to join Indian Premier League franchise Gujarat Lions after two successful years as bowling coach.
Hathurusinghe, on the other hand, was Bangladesh coach until their most recent series in South Africa before he abruptly left without seeing out his three-year contract.
Hathurusinghe’s departure allowed former manager to elevate his position as Team Director, a job which carried the responsibility like any head coach.
Mahmud, Streak and Hathurusinghe will guide their respective teams in the forthcoming tri-nation tournament, beginning at the Sher-e-Bangla National Stadium on Monday.
Streak turned already nostalgic as he felt it was home away from home for him.
‘It was like the other day that I was here,’ said Streak, who nevertheless, took pride in his role as the coach of his own county.
‘These days a lot of coaches are part of a team and become opposition,’ said the former Zimbabwean pacer. ‘I had a good relation with Chandika and Khaled [Mahmud] Sujon, the technical director. I think it will be a good challenge for all of us.’
Streak also backed Hathurusinghe’s decision of leaving Bangladesh to take the charge of Sri Lankan team.
‘The opportunity to coach your own country is always a big thing. I am sure if it was a Bangladeshi coach in another country and he was offered the opportunity to coach his country, most people would find it hard to turn down that opportunity,’ he said.
‘I think Chandika did a really good job for Bangladesh and people mustn’t forget the successes they have had under him... country is always a prestigious thing to coach; everyone aspires to coach their own country,’ added the former Zimbabwean pacer.
Streak, who helped Bangladesh pacers made a steady progress during his two-year tenure, hoped his former charges would give his current team a good run for their money.
‘If I did my job well, it would be more difficult for our guys to perform,’ he said, brushing aside the suggestion that his own knowledge of Bangladesh pacers would an advantage for his team. 

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