India, China responsible for delay in resolving Rohingya crisis: speakers

Staff Correspondent | Published: 00:38, Dec 08,2017 | Updated: 00:41, Dec 08,2017

 
 

Eminent citizens on Thursday blamed Bangladesh’s ‘failed’ foreign policy and India and China, two big nations in the region, for delay in resolving Rohingya crisis.
They also criticised the foreign policy of Bangladesh for not having ‘any friends’ to tackle the situation, while speaking at a symposium titled ‘Rohingya Influx and the Changing Scenario: Options and Challenges for Bangladesh,’ organised by Bangladesh Institute of Law and International Affairs at its office in Dhaka.
India and other countries, which were known to be friends of Bangladesh did not support Bangladesh in resolving the issue, said freedom fighter Zafarullah Chowdhury.
‘For not having any friends in tackling the crisis, the foreign policy of Bangladesh is responsible as it failed to get support from the friend countries,’ he said.
He also added that India was just taking Bangladesh’s support in many issues, but in return it gave nothing to Bangladesh.
Dhaka University international relations professor Delwar Hossain said China and India could play strong role in resolving the Rohingya crisis due to their geo-political and financial relations with Myanmar.
‘Terrorism has been using as an excuse for India to support Myanmar, when China was supporting the country for the geo-political and business relationships’ he said.
Terming the repression on Rohingya people as ‘political problem’, former Bangladesh ambassador to Myanmar Anup Kumar Chakma said repatriation of the Rohingyas would not be enough for resolving the crisis rather they should be given citizenship rights.
Dhaka University international relations professor Akmal Hussain, who presided over the symposium, said Myanmar government had been spreading propaganda against terrorist activities carried out by insurgents like ARSA.
According to the UN estimation till Tuesday, 6,36,000 Rohingyas entered Bangladesh since the beginning of the new influx, what the United Nations called the world’s fastest-developing refugee emergency, on August 25.
Officials estimated that the new influx already took to 10.45 lakh, the number of documented and undocumented Myanmar nationals in Bangladesh entering the country at times since 1978.
The new influx began after Myanmar security forces responded to Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army’s reported attacks on August 25 by launching violence what the United Nations denounced as ethnic cleansing.
Terrified, half-starved and exhausted Rohingyas continued arriving in Bangladesh in groups trekking hills and forests and crossing rough sea and the River Naf on boat and taking shelter wherever they could in Cox’s Bazar.

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