RESOLVING ROHINGYA CRISIS

China wants bilateral talks

Japan, German, Swedish FMs, EU VP to visit Rohingyas today

Diplomatic Correspondent | Published: 00:05, Nov 19,2017 | Updated: 01:47, Nov 19,2017

 
 

Chinese foreign minister Wang Yi on Saturday said his country might facilitate bilateral talks between Bangladesh and Myanmar if the two countries engaged for sustainable solutions to the protracted Rohingya crisis.
‘China is willing to facilitate a dialogue between Myanmar and Bangladesh to resolve the Rohingya crisis,’ Wang Yi said in a meeting with prime minister Sheikh Hasina, according to the PM’s press secretary Ihsanul Karim.
The Chinese foreign minister mentioned that Rohingya issue was the internal problem of Myanmar but affecting Bangladesh, according to United News of Bangladesh.
Sheikh Hasina requested the Chinese minister to mount pressure on Myanmar to take back their nationals.
‘Myanmar will have to take back their nationals ensuring their safety, security and dignity for a durable solution to the crisis,’ she said.
She narrated the plight of the Rohingya people in Bangladesh, especially the women and children, and said a good number of Rohingya women were pregnant.
Reiterating the government’s stance not to allow the land of Bangladesh for using by any terrorist group to commit any acts of insurgency in neighbouring countries, she said, ‘This is our firm decision.’
In his meeting with Bangladesh counterpart, Wang Yi said China would not ‘engage’ herself beyond facilitating bilateral talks between Bangladesh and Myanmar, officials told New Age.
He said the Chinese government would encourage the Myanmar government too for effectively engaging with Bangladesh for resolving the Rohingya problem.
Wang Yi stated that China would help resolve the issue, but ‘will not be partial to any side’.
Foreign minister AH Mahmood Ali led the delegation in the talks also attended by state minister for foreign affairs M Shahriar Alam and foreign secretary M Shahidul Haque, among other senior officials.
Wang Yi expressed satisfaction at the progress of decisions taken and the agreements signed during the milestone visit of President Xi Jinping to Bangladesh in October last year.
He said his country would not want the activities of BCIM Economic Corridor to slow down.
China voted against a resolution on November 16 moved in the UN General Assembly’s human rights committee urging the Myanmar authorities to ensure sustainable return of ethnic minority Rohingyas to their original places of residence with providing citizenship and in safety, security and dignity.
Wang Yi is scheduled to leave Dhaka Sunday.
A US congressional delegation visited Rohingya camps in Balukhali in Cox’s Bazar. US senator Jeffrey Merkley, who was leading the delegation, said they would also visit Myanmar before submitting their report to the US congress.
US congressional delegation members Richard Durbin, Betty McCollum, Jan Schakowsky and David Cicilline and US ambassador to Dhaka Marcia Bernicat were in the team.
Foreign ministers Sigmar Gabriel of Germany, Taro Kono of Japan, Margot Wallström of Sweden and the European Commission vice-president Federica Mogherini were scheduled to reach Dhaka Saturday night.
They are scheduled to visit Rohingya camps in Cox’s Bazar Sunday on their way to Myanmar for the foreign minister-level meeting of a regional group Asia Europe Meeting (ASEM).
Bangladesh foreign minister AH Mahmood Ali would also participate in the two-day ASEM meeting set for November 20-21, before his official bilateral visit in November 22-23 to the country.
Over 6,20,000 minority Rohingyas, mostly women, children and aged people, entered Bangladesh fleeing unbridled murder, arson and rape during ‘security operations’ by Myanmar military in Rakhine, what the United Nations denounced as textbook example of ethnic cleansing, between August 25 and November 16.
The ongoing influx took the total number of undocumented Myanmar nationals and registered refugees in Bangladesh to over 10,39,000 till Sunday, according to estimates of UN agencies.
A bipartisan group of five powerful US lawmakers introduced, in the first week of November, a legislation to impose sanctions on senior military officials of Myanmar who allegedly involved in human rights violation against minority Rohingyas.
US senators John McCain, Ber Cardin, Dick Durbin, Marco Rubio and Todd Young introduced the proposal seeking targeted sanctions and
travel restrictions on senior military officials of Myanmar responsible for the atrocities and systematic human rights abuses against the Rohingya people in Rakhine State of the country.

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