India’s Jaitley shares with Bangladesh ‘benefits’ of cashless economy

Says cash leads to tax evasion, it hurts poor

Business Desk | Published: 22:40, Oct 04,2017 | Updated: 00:23, Oct 05,2017

 
 

Finance minister AMA Muhith, India’s finance minister Arun Jaitley, Indian high commissioner to Bangladesh Harsh Vardhan Shringla and Policy Research Institute chairman Zaidi Sattar are seen at talks on ‘Macroeconomic Initiatives of the Government of India’ organised by PRI and the High Commission of India in Dhaka on Wednesday. — New Age photo

Describing cash-centric economy as one of India’s great challenges, its finance minister Arun Jaitley on Wednesday said the current Indian government is working to make India a less-cash market as it leads to corruption and hurts the poor, reports United News of Bangladesh. 
‘Cash leads to tax evasion, cash leads to shadow economy and cash leads to corruption,’ he said while addressing a ‘talk’ on ‘Macroeconomic Initiatives of the Government of India’ at a city hotel.
Jaitley said a large part of India’s economy just thrived on cash and when it thrives on cash, the curse of cash also exists.
‘One of the great challenges in Indian economy that we always faced was that it was cash-centric economy,’ said the Indian minister adding that India is one of the fastest growing economies in the world over the last three years.
Therefore, he said, from the very first day in office, the government under prime minister Narendra Modi, initiatives were taken step by step to take India in the direction of making a less cash market.
He mentioned that they, in the year 2014, discovered that though India had a very large banking network, only about 58 per cent of Indians or Indian families are connected to a banking system.
And some 42 per cent of the total population was completely outside the financial inclusion, the minister added.
He said the current Indian government took the matter as the very first challenge before them and started working to take these unbanked people into the banking network.
Jaitley said these unbanked people are from ‘rural areas, tribal areas, in geographically more remote areas. There were people who came from parts of central India which were impacted by left-wing extremism.’
He also said the officials started visiting every house, every family to bring unbanked people into the baking system that helped India open 300 million bank accounts in both rural and urban areas in three years.
The Indian minister said excessive cash operates against the poor and it deprives the state of revenue and overall economy.
In countries like India, he said they have seen lot of terror activities that thrived on cash and there have not much done in the past to address it.
Describing the reform in India, he said these reforms will allow India and its economy grow much faster and much greater way. ‘There is lot of room for improvement.’
At the beginning, Jaitley said there is a very significant collaboration and understanding between Bangladesh and India.
He said building of bilateral trust climaxed Bangladesh-India relations, enabling the two neighbours to address their nearly identical challenges, adds Bangladesh Sangbad Sangstha.
‘Our roots are common. The identity of our people is very similar. Therefore, I see lots of our challenges are common.’
Jaitley said bilateral relations developed in the past with the two countries finding their identical roots in the history but in recent years ‘it climaxed’ with expanding cooperation and understanding.
Jaitley said every year some 1.4million Bangladesh visited as he cited the figure as an example of growing ties.
The Policy Research Institute (PRI) and the High Commission of India organised the public lecture, also joined by Bangladesh’s finance minister AMA Muhith while the event was also marked by the launching of online payment of Indian Visa Application Processing Fees.
Speaking at the lecture, finance minister Muhith said development of information and technology is essential to take forward the country and remove corruption.
PRI chairman Zaidi Sattar, delivering the concluding remarks at the function, expected India’s macroeconomic initiatives to yield positive results not only for Indian economy but would ensure its positive spillover effects on the Bangladesh economy in view the vibrant bilateral trade ties.
Indian high commissioner to Bangladesh Harsh Vardhan Shringla was present on the occasion.  

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