‘Digital music can’t match acoustic tunes’

Sheikh Sadi Khan tells New Age

Cultural Correspondent | Published: 22:47, Sep 13,2017 | Updated: 10:13, Sep 15,2017

 
 
Sheikh Sadi Khan

Sheikh Sadi Khan

Eminent music director Sheikh Sadi Khan told New Age that now-a-days music is being created digitally on computers and keyboards but digitally produced tunes can never match the quality of the music created using acoustic instruments. Khan also said that despite its aesthetic value and sound quality acoustic instruments are disappearing fast from the music scene of the country.
Born in a family rich with musical heritage, acclaimed music director Sheikh Sadi Khan joined the Pakistan radio in 1965. He took lessons as a violinist from his elder brother Ustad Bahadur Hossain Khan. He has composed music for cinemas, radio and television. Many local and Indian singers including Asha Bhosle, Kumar Shanu, Runa Laila and Sabina Yasmin have performed songs composed by him. He received National Film Award for Best Music Director twice.
‘Digital music is artificially produced while acoustic music is created using genuine musical instruments, thus, artificial sounds can never be as sweet as sounds produced by acoustic instruments. The way acoustic instruments soothe our eras, digitally created sound can never even come close,’ observed Khan, who also said that music is not a product that you can buy at the departmental stores. In the old days strenuous preparations were made when it came to recording a single song but now creating a composition has become a cheap and hasty venture completed in hours only.
Khan also lamented vanishing of acoustic instruments saying that today’s musicians want to create songs quickly so they don’t bother using acoustic instruments. Thus the instrumentalists are losing jobs and most importantly youngsters are not showing interest to learn playing these instruments.
‘Our music scene is rich with acoustic instruments. We have hundreds of traditional musical instruments including sareng, madol, dhol, dotaara, khamak, sarinda and many others. But if people do not learn playing these instruments then the tunes will be lost forever. I am really concerned about the situation,’ said Khan, who also added that if musicians and directors focus more on using acoustic instruments, these instruments can
survive.
‘It has to be ensured that the traditional instruments and tunes do not disappear as these instruments represent the diversity and richness of our music scene,’ he said.

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