Suu Kyi to skip UNGA amid criticism

Rights groups slam UNSC

Agencies | Published: 01:35, Sep 14,2017 | Updated: 01:42, Sep 14,2017

 
 
Aung San Suu Kyi

People burn an effigy depicting Myanmar state counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi during a protest rally against what they say are killings of Rohingya people in Myanmar, in Kolkata, India September 11, 2017. — Reuters photo

Myanmar’s leader Aung San Suu Kyi, facing outrage over violence that has forced about 400,000 Rohingya Muslims to flee to Bangladesh, will not attend the upcoming UN General Assembly because of the crisis, her office said on Wednesday.
Meanwhile two leading human rights groups on Tuesday slammed the UN Security Council for inaction over the crisis in Myanmar, where 3,70,000 Ro
hingya Muslims have been forced to flee in a campaign described as ethnic cleansing, reports AFP.
The exodus of refugees, sparked by the security forces’ fierce response to a series of Rohingya militant attacks, is the most pressing problem Suu Kyi has faced since becoming leader last year.
Critics have called for her to be stripped of her Nobel peace prize for failing to do more to halt the strife which the UN rights agency said was a ‘textbook example of ethnic cleansing,’ reports Reuters.
Suu Kyi, in her first address to the UN General Assembly as leader in September last year, defended her government’s efforts to resolve the crisis over treatment of the Muslim minority.
This year, her office said she would not be attending because of the security threats posed by the insurgents and her efforts to restore stability.
‘She is trying to control the security situation, to have internal peace and stability, and to prevent the spread of communal conflict,’ Zaw Htay, the spokesman for Suu Kyi’s office, told Reuters.
International pressure has been growing on Buddhist-majority Myanmar to end the violence in the western state of Rakhine that began on Aug 25 when Rohingya militants attacked about 30 police posts and an army camp.
The raids triggered a sweeping military counter-offensive against the insurgents, described by the government as terrorists. Refugees say the security operation is aimed at pushing Rohingya out of Myanmar.
They, and rights groups, paint a picture of widespread attacks on Rohingya villages in the north of Rakhine State by the security forces and ethnic Rakhine Buddhists, who have torched many Muslim villages.
Authorities have denied that the security forces, or Buddhist civilians, have been setting the fires, and have blamed the insurgents. Nearly 30,000 Buddhist villagers have also been displaced, they say.
The Trump administration has called for protection of civilians, and Bangladesh says all the refugees will have to go home and has called for safe zones in Myanmar.
But China, which competes with the United States for influence in Asia, said on Tuesday it backed Myanmar’s efforts to safeguard ‘development and stability’.
The UN Security Council is to meet on Wednesday behind closed doors for the second time since the crisis erupted. British UN ambassador Matthew Rycroft said he hoped there would be a public statement agreed by the council.
However, rights groups denounced the council for not holding a public meeting. Diplomats have said China and Russia would likely object to such a move.
Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International deplored the council’s failure to speak out and demand an end to the violence in western Rakhine state as the top UN body prepared to hold a closed-door session on Wednesday, AFP reports.
Britain and Sweden requested the meeting on Myanmar, two weeks after the council met, also behind closed doors. No formal statement was issued following that meeting on August 30.
‘This is ethnic cleansing on a large scale, it seems, and the Security Council cannot open its doors and stand in front of the cameras? It’s appalling frankly,’ HRW’s UN director Louis Charbonneau told reporters.
‘Without some sort of public proclamation by Security Council members, the message you are sending to the Myanmar government is deadly, and they will continue to do it,’ said Sherine Tadros, head of Amnesty International’s UN office.
Other than condemning the violence, the council could adopt a resolution threatening sanctions against those responsible for the repression, said Human Rights Watch.
 

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