Sakib stars in Australian hunt

Azad Majumder | Published: 00:05, Aug 31,2017 | Updated: 00:02, Aug 31,2017

 
 
Bangladesh, Australia, cricket

Bangladesh all-rounder Sakib al Hasan (L) celebrates the wicket of Australian batsman Matthew Wade (not in picture) during the fourth day of their first Test at the Sher-e-Bangla National Stadium on Wednesday. — Sourav Losker

As Taijul Islam struck Josh Hazlewood plumb for leg-before there were some confusions in the middle. Umpire Nigel Llong raised his finger to signal the fall of final wicket, but Hazlewood was unmoved.
He clearly wanted to review the decision but there was none left for Australia. Bangladeshi players knew it, so they started celebrating immediately without waiting for the drama to end.

Bangladeshi cricket fans celebrate the maiden Test win against Australia on Dhaka University campus Wednesday. — New Age photo

Hazlewood realised his mistake soon and trudged back to the fielders to congratulate Bangladesh for yet another historic win, the Tigers’ first against Australia and second in a row on home soil.
Unlike the past major wins, Bangladesh’s celebration was not wild though. There was no lap of honour in the field or any gangnam-style dance as the win was somewhat expected by the Bangladeshi players.
They started the fourth day’s play as underdogs, were at the receiving end of a buccaneering century from David Warner, yet the players seemed to kept believe on their skills.
They were rewarded with an outstanding win as Australia lost their last eight wickets for 86 runs to be finally dismissed for 244 runs in their second innings after resuming the day on 109-2.
There were few twists and turns in the game as it happened to many other Test matches, but Bangladesh came out as winners for their self-belief and never-say-die attitude.
They were also lucky to have an all-rounder in their rank namely Sakib al Hasan, who bowled with his heart out to break the new ground with his second 10-wicket haul in career.
Sakib summoned his skills just when Australia looked firmly on top with David Warner completing his 19th Test century, his only second in Asia, which came off 121 balls.
Bangladesh bowled plenty of short balls on the third day and the trend did not change until Sakib trapped him leg-before for 112 to end his 130-run third wicket stand with skipper Steve Smith.
It was the kind of opening Bangladesh needed badly and they did not look back afterwards, reviving the memory of their win over England, who collapsed from 100-0 to 164 all out in a session in last October.
Smith, arguably one of the finest batsmen against spin, could have caused some problems but Sakib ensured he did not get more
than 37 runs, forcing him to edge one to wicketkeeper Mushfiqur Rahim.
Taijul, bowling perhaps to save his career, provided two more wickets quickly to leave Australia at 199-7 at lunch with their last recognised batsman Glenn Maxwell at the crease.
Sakib, who finished with 5-85 in the second innings, bowled Maxwell in the first ball after the break to end the game as contest and complete his second 10-wicket haul in career to go with his 84 runs in the first innings.
The game, however, still had some dramas left. Pat Cummins was slowly becoming a major headache for Bangladesh, unleashing few shots to add 29 runs with Nathan Lyon for the ninth wicket.
Mehedi Hasan, quiet since morning was called into action to break their stand, bringing last man Hazlewood to the wicket.
Cummins protected him for 15 minutes but that was not enough for them to pull off a heist as Taijul removed Hazlewood to complete the history and finish another Test with 3-60.  

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