Jute curves niche to revitalise Tokyo greenery

Shakhawat Hossain . back from Japan | Published: 00:48, May 22,2017 | Updated: 00:54, May 22,2017

 
 

Jute hessian originated in Bangladesh has curved a niche for revitalising Tokyo’s greenery as it is used widely for transplantation of big and old trees across Japan.
Transplantation of more than 3-4 metre long trees, wrapping with jute hessian and jute rope from tip to toe, on footpaths is a common sight in Tokyo and its adjoining areas like Haneda, Yokohama, Kamata and Kawasaki.
Transplanted trees acclimatizing to new soil and weather condition with the support of jute hessian are also available in parks in Japan.
‘We cover a tree, which is to be transplanted, with jute hessian as part of the delicate method of transplantation’ said gardener Anzai Hinata of the Ashikaga Flower Park, one of the most visited places located 80km north of Tokyo.
With the help of an interpreter the gardener told this reporter that they were taught to use jute hessian to wrap around the roots and soil of a tree shortly after digging it out from its original location.
The hessian’s moisture-resistant properties prevent accumulation of excess water and allow the growth of the transplanted trees, he said.
He said jute hessian went there from Bangladesh.
The use of jute hessian became an integral part of transplantation of big and old trees after Tsukamoto Konami, Japan’s first female tree doctor, used it for transplanting 130-year-old four wisteria trees in 1996 to Ashikaga Flower Park from a distance of 20 kilometres.
Bangladesh, the second largest jute producing country, exported jute and jute goods worth $6 million to Japan in 2013-14, according to Dhaka Chamber of Commerce and Industry.
In February, jute minister Muhammad Imajuddin Pramanik told parliament that jute and jute goods exports across the world helped the country to earn Tk 7,294 crore in 2015-16.
The amount was Tk 875 crore higher than the exports in the previous financial year as use of jute was growing worldwide because of environment-friendly and diversified use of it.
From Kamata police station to Haneda airport, there are transplanted trees with the support of jute hessian at the gap of 10 to 15 yards in both side of the less than one kilometre road.
Mizanur Rahman, a Bangladeshi studying in a Japanese language school, said the widespread use of jute hessian for transplantation of trees was found everywhere in central Tokyo and its suburban.
Only the government-appointed gardeners took care of transplanted trees and no other people ever touched the hessian, he said.
The number of roadside trees in Tokyo doubled to 1 million by the end of fiscal 2015 as part of the ‘Regenerating Tokyo’s Abundant Greenery’ programme, according to a document of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government.
A substantial number of the trees are transplanted to make up the loss of greenery to urbanisation in Tokyo during the past four decades.
Tsunekazu Takeda, president of Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, unveiled the Japanese government plans for planting and transplanting more roadside trees aiming at making Tokyo ‘world’s most low-carbon city’ ahead of the sporting extravaganza.

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