No conservation action plan for 386 threatened animal species

Sadiqur Rahman | Published: 01:14, Mar 14,2017

 
 

Out of 390 threatened animal species the government took no conservation action plan for 386 species raising serious concern among experts.
The International Union for Conservation of Nature placed 390 animal species of the country in its Red List of Threatened Species one year ago.
Currently only four action plans are under implementation for the conservation of Bengal Tiger, Asian elephant, gharial and white-ramped vulture.
Forest officials told New Age that the plans provide the guidelines for conservation, the strategies for combating the threats to conservation and spell out the objectives of conservation.
Conservationists said that the government should immediately adopt focused action plans for the conservation of critically endangered species with emphasis on breeding and restoration of habitats.
In 2015, the Department of Forest updated its Red List of Threatened Species with technical support from the IUCN.
In 2016, IUCN and DoF published a seven-volume exhaustive report on the status of assessment of 1,619 animal species including seven groups of mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds, freshwater fishes, crustaceans and butterflies.
The report categorized 390 species as threatened, 56 of them as critically endangered, 181 as endangered and 153 as vulnerable.
IUCN Bangladesh officials said 160 biologists prepared the red list under six lead assessors and two technical reviewers.
Professor Mohammad Mostafa Feeroz who led the mammals’ status evaluation team said that the authorities should take conservation action plans for 47 threatened mammals other than tiger and elephant.
He said the critically endangered species like otter, clouded leopard, hoolock gibbon, langur, pangolin and macaque were on the verge of extinction.
Professor Monwar Hossain, the lead assessor for butterflies said that habitat loss posed the main threat to breeding for
almost 80 per cent of the butterflies, especially the critically endangered Sundarban Crow.
He recommended immediate action plan to conserve the crucial indicators of healthy ecosystem.
Crustacean experts said that unabated water pollution due to rampant use of pesticides and toxic waste dumping were destroying the habitats of shrimps, crabs, lobsters and the other crustaceans.
Mustafa Ali Reza Hossain, the lead assessor for the crustaceans demanded a comprehensive action plan for the conservation of endangered species from extinction by neutralizing multiple threats to endangered species posed by unplanned tourism and overfishing.
The lead assessor for amphibian species Monirul H Khan said 20 per cent of the amphibians and reptiles including frogs and turtles were threatened by overexploitation and environment pollution.
Assistant forest conservator Abu Naser Mohsin Hossain said that action plans for the conservation of critically endangered sea turtle, crocodile and spoon-billed sandpiper were under preparation.
He said that action plans for the conservation of the rest of the threatened species would be prepared gradually.

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