INTERNATIONAL SHORT and INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL

First Chakma feature film premiered

Cultural Correspondent
A still from Mor Thengari, the first feature film in Chakma language, which was premiered on Friday at the Central Public Library.

A still from Mor Thengari, the first feature film in Chakma language, which was premiered on Friday at the Central Public Library.

The first ever Chakma feature film of the country was premiered on Friday at the Shawkat Osman Auditorium at the Central Public Library in the capital in presence of Chakma king Debashish Roy, who was present at the programme as the chief guest.
Titled Mor Thengari (My Bicycle), the feature film written and directed by Aung Rakhaine, was screened as part of ongoing 13th International Short and Independent Film Festival.
Noted filmmaker Nurul Alam Atique and Aung Rakhaine were also present at the premiere show. In his speech, Chakma king Debashish Roy said that few Chakma language films have been made in India, but a full-length feature film in Chakma language has never been made in Bangladesh before Mor Thengari. ‘It is a great attempt, particularly in the present time as the Chakma language is dying and the government is doing nothing about it,’  said Roy.
Aung Rakhaine informed that though he belongs to Rakhaine community, he chose to make the film on Chakma community as their struggles are far more intense than he Rakhines.
‘I have been planning the film for 10 years and at last could make it. I am planning to send the film to international festivals,’ Aung Rakhaine informed to New Age at the programme.
The English subtitled film depicts a Chakma man who loses his job in the city and returns to his village empty handed except a bicycle. In dire financial conditions, the man finds a way to provide for his family. He begins to use his bicycle to transport people and goods from his village to the bazaar. But some local goons try to extort money from him, and when he refuses to pay, they break the bicycle.
The simple portrayal of Chakma life, scenic beauty of Rangamati hill tracts and good acting made the film enjoyable to the full-hall audience.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Advertisement