Dhaka WASA service discriminatory in rich, poor areas: TIB study

Staff Correspondent
Transparency International Bangladesh holds a news conference releasing a report on irregularities in water management in Bangladesh at its office in Dhaka on Sunday. — New Age photo

Transparency International Bangladesh holds a news conference releasing a report on irregularities in water management in Bangladesh at its office in Dhaka on Sunday. — New Age photo

The service of Dhaka Water and Sewerage Authority varies in rich, middle class and poor areas, considering the socio-economic status of the citizens, finds a study.
Transparency International Bangladesh and Bangladesh Water Integrity Network jointly carried out the study from September 2014 to June 2015 on the integrity in water management of DWASA and Bangladesh Water Development Board.
The study findings were disclosed at a press conference on Sunday at the TIB office in Dhanmondi in the capital.
‘DWASA’s services vary in rich, middle class and poor areas considering the socio-economic status of citizens’, said the study.
‘Defying official procedures, DWASA officials and political figures control the water supply’, the study said.
The study found that the BWDB was facing challenge due to absence of proper policy in water management.
‘The policies, laws, projects and their implementations are incoherent and backward’, the study observed.
It said the BWDB officials were found indulging in massive corruption but the legal loopholes were barrier for taking measures against them.
Jahangirnagar University geological science professor Syed Hafizur Rahman and geography and environment professor Sheikh Tawhidul Islam were lead researchers of the study.
Sheikh Tawhidul Islam said the study was a baseline study on the integrity in water management in Bangladesh.
He said the study focused on Dhaka WASA for sampling the water management system in urban areas and BWDB in Satkhira district for sampling the condition of rural areas.
TIB executive director Iftekharuzzaman said, ‘Both the institutions expressed commitment for service, but there were lack of initiative to fulfill the commitments’.
‘We have tried to show the loopholes where the transparency and accountability are absence in the institutions’, he said.
He said there were gaps in communication and participation of service providers and service takers which was a challenge to ensure transparency and accountability of the institutions.
The study recommended that the policies, laws and strategies on water management should be renewed.
Besides, the National Water Resource Council should be made a watchdog according to Water Act 2013, it recommended.

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